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 411mania » Music » Album Reviews

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Prozak - We All Fall Down Review
Posted by Bill Wannop on 09.18.2013



We All Fall Down Prozak has long considered himself to be the Hitchcock of Hip Hop, an artist who strives his best to tell gripping tales and provide dark images through his music. While he may not be well known to many, Prozak has released three solo albums, with his last album, Paranormal peaking at number 90 on the US top 200 charts. Prozak is back with his latest album, We All Fall Down, but does Prozak have enough eerie tales to continue to call himself the Hitchcock of Hip Hop?

Track listing
1. Divided We Stand
2. Audio Barricade
3. Just Like Nothing
4. The Ghost Of Injustice (Interlude)
5. Blood Paved Road
6. Fading Away
7. Three, Two, One
8. Vendetta
9. Nowhere To Run
10. Distress Call
11. Darkest Shade Of Grey
12. We All Fall Down
13. The Shadow Of Mortality (Interlude)
14. Time
15. Before We Say Goodbye

Prozak starts off the album with the slow and mellow track, “Divided We Stand”, where Prozak goes into detail about the dangers that face the world, such as over population and global warming. It is a very negative image of the world, but through his verses, Prozak manages to paint a very vivid and dark picture of the potential wasteland of a world. Now to many first time listeners of Prozak, they may just jump to the conclusion that he is just another horrorcore rapper from Detriot. While it is true that he makes music about very dark and often times violent topics, he does it in a way in which he paints a story or manages to convey a moral message at the end of the song. Whether you agree or disagree with his message is another topic, but there are the viewpoints of Prozak and you cannot hold it against him for having and voicing his opinion.

One of the things you will notice right away from the album is that Prozak got a lot of help on his chorus work. This was one of the aspects that a lot of hip hop artists have trouble with and you can tell with this release that this is something that Prozak made a point of addressing. Tracks such as “Just Like Nothing”, and “Fading Away” are slower, more acoustic sounding tracks, they would have sounded somewhat strange with Prozak’s deep voice providing the vocals. Instead he enlisted some outside help and really selected a voice that fit the overall mood of the tracks. Most of the tracks on this album are more acoustic and laid back, but there are even tracks that sound somewhat country, such as “Nowhere To Run”, which really serves to show the versatility of Prozak. Even on these tracks, Prozak manages to get across his deeper meanings and messages, in the aforementioned track he points toward what he considers to be many government conspiracies.



One of the stand out tracks on the album is “We All Fall Down”, which has a great sample as the hook and is a song that is somewhat introspective and sums up just who Prozak really is. On the track Prozak raps, “I feel like every single second’s the same/ it’s sort of like suffocating under the reigns of satans chains/But I maintain, it’s a damn shame/ How we all fall and drop some brick walls and simply fade away/Into the memories of yesterday and when there is no one to remember the human race shall cast away”

While Prozak seems to hit on all level on the slower, more mellow sounding tracks, he still manages to bring the aggressiveness on some tracks such as “Three, Two, One”, where a heavy guitar beat has Prozak counting down until the end of the world. “Vendetta” has Prozak again riding a heavy metal beat while his aggressive and violent lyrics show us some of the rage that is within. These tracks don’t really carry a lot of weight compared to the previously mentioned tracks and are somewhat skippable. While Prozak can do some decent heavy metal type tracks, they just don’t really work on this album and don’t really fit the entire theme of the album or match the quality of the other tracks. Lastly it seems like while Prozak is more subtle about his message and themes on the slower tracks, on the heavy tracks it seems as though he is repeatedly hitting you over the head with his message, which is much less effective.

The rock track that does work is “Darkest Shade of Gray” which has Prozak wondering why humansdo the things they do, even when they know it is wrong. Additionally, the track “Blood Paved Road” has Prozak producing what somewhat sounds like an Everlast flow talking about how the country was built by basically stealing from others. These are the types of tracks that Prozak excels at, where he lets the message and story build slowly throughout the song.

On this release Prozak tries a lot of different things, and listeners will be surprised in that the sound that actually works really well is the mellower and laid back sound, not the aggressive heavy tracks that Prozak is previously known for. Prozak is best when he lets the story and message build organically instead on seaming to force the issue. While the album is somewhat scattered, the beginning and end of the album really shine with a small gap in the middle that could have been left on the cutting room floor.

On this release Prozak seemed to move away from his Hitchcock of Hip Hop moniker, something that surprisingly worked out well.

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The 411: On this release Prozak tries a lot of different things, and listeners will be surprised in that the sound that actually works really well is the mellower and laid back sound, not the aggressive heavy tracks that Prozak is previously known for. Prozak is best when he lets the story and message build organically instead on seaming to force the issue. While the album is somewhat scattered, the beginning and end of the album really shine with a small gap in the middle that could have been left on the cutting room floor. On this release Prozak seemed to move away from his Hitchcock of Hip Hop moniker, something that surprisingly worked out well.
 
Final Score:  7.5   [ Good ]  legend





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