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Bridgeport Music Dropped as Defendant from Lawsuit Over 'Blurred Lines'
Posted by Jeffrey Harris on 03.27.2014



THR reports that Bridgeport Music has been dropped as a defendant from the lawsuit involving Robin Thicke's "Blurred Lines."

Due to an agreement between parties, Bridgeport Music was dropped as a defendant on Wednesday (March 26). The lawsuit will no longer consider whether the hit song is copyright infringement on "Sexy Ways" by the Funkadelic.

Thicke and producers Pharrell Williams and Clifford Harris Jr. (rapper TI) filed a preemptive lawsuit last August seeking declaratory relief and suggested that threats were being made by the rights-holder of Funkadelic's songs. After that, George Clinton, who previously led Funkadelic and feuded with Bridgeport over the years, tweeted his belief that there was no sample in "Blurred Lines."

Now that Bridgeport has been removed from the dispute, the litigation now remains between Thicke's side and the children over Marvin Gaye over whether "Blurred Lines" is too similar to Gaye's "Got to Give It Up" and if Thicke's "Love After War" is too similar to Gaye's "After the Dance."

The plaintiffs claim that "being reminiscent of a 'sound' is not copyright infringement." The defendants are saying that Thicke has gone too far with his "Marvin Gaye fixation."

A meditation session is now scheduled for next month, and a trial is set for November.





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